employment law

Proposed new overtime rules

04.3.2019
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Back in 2016, employers nationwide prepared to comply with scheduled changes to overtime eligibility rules. The 2016 changes were never implemented, but on March 7 this year, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) released new proposed changes. If implemented, the changes would raise the overtime salary threshold for non-exempt workers from $455/week ($23,660/year) to $679/week ($35,308/year). Currently, the DOL projects that if adopted, the rule is intended to take effect around January 2020.

The rule is still in the proposal stage, meaning that it’s not final and the public may submit […]

New St. Paul Minimum Wage Law

11.20.2018
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Last week, St. Paul enacted a new minimum-wage ordinance which will take effect on December 14. The ordinance creates a minimum wage of $15/hour. However, businesses don’t have pay that wage immediately. Instead, the minimum wage will increase gradually over several years until every employer pays that wage. The ordinance is enforced by the St. Paul Department of Human Rights and Equal Economic Opportunity (the “Department”).

What are the phases and which ones apply to my business? The timing depends on how many employees you have. There are four categories:

Macro businesses: over 10,000 […]

FAQs: OSHA for Minnesota businesses

10.15.2018
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What is OSHA and does it regulate my business?

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a federal agency responsible for ensuring workplace safety. In many states, OSHA regulates businesses directly. However, some states, including Minnesota, regulate businesses themselves. In Minnesota, most workplace safety regulation is handled by the Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health Administration (MNOSHA). The federal-level OSHA retains regulatory control over a few areas and industries.

Where do I find MNOSHA standards?

Minnesota’s Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) provides an overview of MNOSHA regulations, with links to the text of […]

How should employers verify work authorization?

08.1.2018
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Under federal law, it’s illegal for a U.S. employer to employ a person who’s not authorized to work in the U.S. This is why every employee has to sign IRS form I-9, the “employment eligibility verification.” Part of the form requires new hires to present documents such as a driver’s license or passport to demonstrate identity and work authorization.

What happens when an employer thinks those documents might be fabricated? For example, what if a person doesn’t resemble their driver’s license photo? Many employers aren’t sure whether they should assume the […]